Royal Academy of Art’s Type Blog 

Frank E. Blokland (Leiden, 1959) studied Graphic and Typographic design at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague from 1978 until 1983. As a student, he founded the working group Letters], from which have come many now well known Dutch typedesigners. Blokland’s ideas about typography are clear: ‘Typography means more than bringing order to the passing on of information; it means elevating to the sublime the mould in which the process of passing on is cast’.

Lettering (Cellini capitals) by Frank E. Blokland of the Homomonument in Amsterdam (1986)

During the eighties, Blokland designed the letterings of a number of monuments, among which the Homomonument at the Westerkerk in Amsterdam.

Analog drawings of accompanying roman (baptized Orfeo) for the Cellini capitals (1987)

Design (analog drawings) for sand-blasted lettering of a monument for the city of Leiden (1988)

During that period he worked together with the famous sculptor Frans de Wit on a number of monuments for the city of Leiden.

Logo designed and cut in granite by Frank E. Blokland (around 1990)

Also around that time Blokland started to cut letters in stone.

Gravestone designed and cut by Frank E. Blokland (1996)

Calligraphy, the art of writing by Frank E. Blokland

Calligraphy, the art of writing by Frank E. Blokland

Blokland wrote the book for the television course Calligraphy, the art of writing in 1990; 16.000 copies of this book went over the counter. Further since the 1980s he has written some 150 articles on type design and font production for various graphic and design magazines, like Compres, Pers, PrintBuyer, Hamburger Satzspiegel and Page.

Masthead for magazine by Frank E. Blokland (around 1990)

Masthead for magazine by Frank E. Blokland (around 1990)

Masthead for magazine by Frank E. Blokland (1993)

Masthead for magazine by Frank E. Blokland (1994)

Vendex_KBB logo by Frank E. Blokland and HV&P

Vendex_KBB logo by Frank E. Blokland and HV&P

During the 1990s Blokland worked closely together with the design agency Hazelhoff de Vaal & partners on a number of logo’s and mastheads.

Modifications generated with DrawMonkey on an Acorn Electron

Modifications generated with DrawMonkey

Blokland purchased his first computer in 1983; it was an Acorn Electron. He programmed a simple tool for digitizing vectored letters, and for subsequently interpolating and modifying these. It was baptized ‘DrawMonkey’, which is the direct translation of the Dutch ‘Tekenaap’, i.e., a pantograph. For getting output other than on the screen, one had to be quite inventive to get printers connected, eproms installed, et cetera. Although DrawMonkey in all its simpleness functioned well (see image above), Blokland realized back then that others were better equipped for programming than he was, as he himself was more skilled in designing type. That insight formed the basis for the later cooperation with the programmers at URW(++) in Hamburg, Germany, which eventually resulted in the DTL FontMaster tools.

Proprietary screen font for ‘BBC Electron’ home computer (1983)

After years of preparation, in 1990 Frank E. Blokland founded the Dutch Type Library, the first and nowadays largest producer and publisher of digital typefaces in the Netherlands.

Dutch Type Library logo

A couple of years later he initiated and supervised the development of DTL FontMaster, a set of utilities for professional font production developed by DTL and the Hamburg, Germany, based company URW++.

DTL BezierMaster, one of the modules of the DTL FontMaster suite

The regular and bold n’s of the original manually bitmapped version of DTL Documenta (1986)

Blokland has designed typefaces like DTL Documenta, DTL Documenta Sans, DTL Haarlemmer (on the basis of drawings by Jan van Krimpen), DTL Haarlemmer Sans and DTL Romulus (also based on drawings by Jan van Krimpen).

DTL Documenta was the corporate typeface of the Rijksmuseum

DTL Documenta was the corporate typeface of the Rijksmuseum

For roughly a decade the seriffed and sans versions of DTL Documenta formed the corporate identity typefaces of the famous Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The typeface was used for the signage in- and outside the museum, publications, annual reports, et cetera.

Gotteslob 2013 and DTL Documenta

DTL Documenta applied in Gotteslob

DTL Documenta has been applied in Gotteslob, the new prayer and song book of the Catholic church in Germany and Austria.The production of the 3.6 million copies (1,300 pages each) required eight tons of red ink and roughly 3,000 tons of light-weight paper (40 grams).

DTL Haarlemmer is used for street signs of the city of Haarlem

DTL Haarlemmer is used for the street signs of the city of Haarlem

Since 2010 new street signs are placed in the city of Haarlem for which DTL Haarlemmer is used. The design agency Bureau Arjan Karssen selected the seriffed version for the street signs in the historic city centre, and the accompanying sans serif is used on two different signs for the pre- and post World War II parts of the city.

Drawings for the Bacchus typeface (1986–1990)

First DTL Fell pencil drawing with IKARUS markings by Frank E. Blokland (1997)

When Gerrit Noordzij retired in 1987 from the Royal Academy of Art (KABK) in The Hague, Blokland was the first of the younger generation to succeed him. As Senior Lecturer Blokland now teaches writing, letter drawing, and type design/font production to the graduate and post-graduate courses at the Graphic Design department.

Lecturing first year students of Graphic Design department at the KABK (2008)

In 1995 he was asked to become professor at the Plantin Society in Antwerp. Further he has lectured as a guest professor at institutes like the Technical University of Delft, the University of Reading, and Lahti Polytechnic University.

Jan van Krimpen’s 1950’s logo for the Plantin Society, digitized and redesigned by Blokland in 2011

In 2004–2011 Blokland designed the lettering for the newly restored stained glass windows of the St. Peter’s Church in Leiden, the Netherlands. On YouTube a short film (Dutch spoken) shows the restoration of the church, and the design and production of the lettering.

Stained glass lettering for St. Peter’s Church, Leiden by Frank E. Blokland

April 2013 Blokland designed the calligraphic lettering of H.M. Queen Beatrix’s Abdication Act. The letters on the act, in Humanistic Minuscule and Italic hands, with all their contextual letter-variants, were written by Blokland and transferred by himself into two digital fonts: Abdicatie Regular and Abdicatie Italic using the DTL FontMaster tools. The text was subsequently silkscreened on parchment.

Silkscreened calligraphic lettering on the Abdication Act 2013, designed by Frank E. Blokland

Silkscreened calligraphic lettering on the Abdication Act 2013, designed by Frank E. Blokland

The Adication Act 2013 Team. FLTR: Henk Reuter, Trudie Demoed, Jaap Drupsteen, Frank E. Blokland

The Adication Act 2013 Team: FLTR: Henk Reuter, Trudie Demoed, Jaap Drupsteen, Frank E. Blokland

Currently Blokland is doing a PhD study at Leiden University, in which harmonic systems in type play a central role; see also this web site.

Student Identity Card from Leiden University of Frank E. Blokland

Student Identity Card from Leiden University of Frank E. Blokland

Unitized matrices of Garamont’s Gros Canon Romain

Unitized matrices of Garamont’s Gros Canon Romain

One of the outcomes of this research is a set of Python extensions (LS Cadencer and LS Cadenculator) for (batch) analysis and auto-spacing of fonts based on organic (archetypal) patterning, developed by Lukas Schneider in cooperation with Blokland.

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